CUNY Internship Program

About the Internship Program
Since 2016, the Natural Areas Conservancy has offered more than 70 paid internships to City University of New York (CUNY) students who are pursuing careers in conservation science and other related fields. Our internships take place each semester with an eight-week, full-time field ecology program each summer. We also offer additional internship opportunities in the fall.

Throughout the internship, CUNY students receive training in plant identification, field ecology, data management, and ecological surveying methods. They participate in professional development opportunities including resume development and networking sessions with NYC Parks Commissioners past and present, the Wildlife Conservation Society, Bloomberg LP, and NYC Parks.

Our CUNY internship program is generously funded by: Jamaica Bay-Rockaway Parks Conservancy, Jerome Levy Foundation, Leon Levy Foundation, Three Cairns Group, Stavros Niarchos Foundation, and Julie Robbins.

Hear from our 2020 Interns:
“Through our assigned projects, I’ve improved my existing software skills and learned how to use GIS for the first time. I’ve enjoyed the data analysis component of the internship so much more than I expected! It has boosted my confidence in my ability to be successful in the field of environmental science.”
— Morgan, Undergraduate studying Earth and Environmental Science at the College of Staten Island

“In my anticipated career, I hope to perform scientific research in different ecosystems, and knowing how to identify plants is a vital part of documenting ecological health. Through the NAC’s internship program, I learned plant biology and terminology, which are skills that can be applied when studying any ecosystem.”
— Jisun, Undergraduate double majoring in Environmental Studies and Sociology at Hunter College

“My teamwork and plant identification skills have greatly improved because of this internship. I've had the chance to meet professionals in the field and ask them about potential career paths and opportunities. Despite not knowing exactly what career path I want to pursue, I feel much more confident about moving forward.”
— Richard, Graduate from Hunter College with a degree in Environmental Science